East Riding council has spent £1m on fly-tipping cleanup

East Yorkshire council spending taxpayers’ money on fly-tipping clean up

According to the Pocklington Post, the East Riding of Yorkshire Council has spent more than £1 million of taxpayers’ money cleaning up fly-tipped waste in the last three years.

Since April 2013, the number of fly-tipping incidents have increased year on year; in total the council has recorded a 11 per cent rise in fly-tipping crime in the last three years.

Council has spent £1m on cleaning up fly-tipping

The council is paying out money to clean up fly-tipping like this one in Grindale, East Riding

 

In recent months, East Riding council has witnessed a significant increase in the dumping of building waste on rural land in the district. The areas of South Cave and North and South Newbald have been particularly affected by this type of crime, which can carry a fine of up to £50,000 and imprisonment of up to 12 months.

According to council figures, there were 2,817 fly-tipping incidents recorded between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014 in East Yorkshire, costing the council £350,000 in clear up costs. The following year, there were 2,903 incidents, costing approximately £340,000.

Last year, between April 1, 2015 to March 31, fly-tipping offences reached 3,126. East Riding council has used £350,000 of taxpayers’ money to clean up after unscrupulous residents and traders.

A spokesperson from East Riding of Yorkshire Council warned potential fly-tippers that any instances of illegally disposed of waste will be thoroughly investigated by council officers.

The spokesperson added: “It is vital that householders understand that, to operate legally, firms that remove waste have to be registered with the Environment Agency as licensed waste carriers. If fly-tipped items can be traced back to their owner, they could face a fine of up to £5,000.”

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Scottish councils sign £700m waste recycling deal

Five Clyde Valley councils partner with Viridor to redirect landfill waste for recycling

Five Scottish councils have signed a waste recovery contract worth £700 million with waste management firm Viridor, which will collect and recycle the districts’ municipal waste that was previously destined for landfill.

The contract will run for 25 years and is to begin on December 1, 2019. The councils in North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, East Renfrewshire, East Dunbartonshire and North Ayrshire are all part of the new deal, which was negotiated for and signed by head council authority in the Clyde Valley, North Lanarkshire.

Viridor will be responsible for collecting municipal waste from the partner districts; the waste will then be taken for recycling at Viridor’s plant in Bargeddie, North Lanarkshire. Any surplus waste that is not suitable for recycling will be sent to Viridor’s waste to energy facility, which is to be built in Dunbar, East Lothian.

North Lanarkshire council expects 190,000 tonnes of waste to be collected for recycling, which was previously going to landfill sites, costing the local authorities landfill tax and damaging the environment. According to Viridor director, Paul Ringham, the firm hopes to redirect 90 per cent of the partner councils’ waste from landfill sites.

The partnership between the Scottish councils is the first to come about since Sir John Arbuthnott, former chairman of the Greater Glasgow Health Board, suggested in a 2009 review that Clyde Valley councils could benefit financially from working together.

Council leader for North Lanarkshire, Jim Logue, said: “This is an important contract in terms of the scale of waste processing and environmental benefits. By working in partnership, we are delivering improved services for residents, best value for taxpayers, creating new jobs and recycling more waste which would otherwise go to landfill.”

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Cardiff residents angry after fly-tipping increase

Residents in Cardiff city notice an increase in fly-tipping following council waste changes

Residents from multiple Cardiff city districts have spoken out about their anger towards the council as waste collection service changes seem to have led to an increase in the amount of fly-tipped waste being dumped on the city streets.

Homeowners in Penylan and Splott are blaming Cardiff City Council for the apparent increase in fly-tipping incidents which are being perpetrated in these two districts and in others around the city.

 

Residents angry at increased fly-tipping offences

Penylan, Cardiff

 

In July last year, the council introduced a new waste collection system to improve recycling rates. The old 240 litre black wheelie bins, which were previously held by residents, were replaced at a cost of around £2 million by Cardiff City Council with a new 140 litre black bin and a 240 litre green waste bin.

Residents across the affected areas claim that the new 140 litre bins are not large enough for most households and that this is one of the main causes for the increase in fly-tipping.

Homeowners claim that bags of waste and random items of trash are being dumped in city streets and lanes and are creating an “eyesore, obstruction and a health hazard”.

Ian Layzell, from Keep Our Neighbourhood Bin Free, said that the council does eventually collect the fly-tipped waste, but in some instances, it can be sat in the streets for weeks.

Despite the complaints from Cardiff residents, Cabinet member Bob Derbyshire from Cardiff City Council said that the new waste collection service has been successful and the council has seen a rise in the amount of waste being sent for recycling instead of to landfill.

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