The primary school pupils creating a recycling handbook

The recycling project is designed to educate and encourage children to recycle

An electrical and electronic waste company based in Lancashire has initiated a recycling project amongst primary school children across the country, as they work together to author a WEEE recycling manual designed to educate young people on the importance of recycling their electronics.

The handbook, titled ‘Responsible Recycling’, has been passed from primary school to primary school across the UK and follows the adventures of R3PIC, a robot made up of recycled electronics, and the mascot of REPIC Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment, the Bury-based company behind the project.

School pupils write recycling manual for WEEE

Click on the website link above to read about R3PIC’s adventures

 

Year 3 and 4 pupils from each school have the opportunity to write a chapter each, detailing the imaginative recycling adventures of R3PIC. The story is now being completed by pupils in Bradford and Solihull before it goes off to be produced into an illustrated edition later this year.

As part of the ‘Responsible Recycling’ project, Bury Council’s recycling awareness officer, Talat Afzal, visited the schools involved to speak to the children about recycling and how it is an essential process to help save our environment.

WEEE waste firm, REPIC, launched the project in an effort to educate young people as they are now surrounded by an increasing amount of electronic equipment and gadgets.

Dr Philip Morton, chief executive of REPIC, told BuryTimes.co.uk: “The main aim of the campaign is to educate children on recycling issues from a young age. Children are the ambassadors of the future for recycling and are key in spreading the message to parents and carers.”

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Department for Business increases 2016 WEEE collection targets

The WEEE collection target has been increased by 16,000 tonnes for 2016

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills has increased its 2016 Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) collection targets following the release of collection data for 2015, which suggested that the initial target was not ambitious enough.

The initial WEEE collection target for 2016 set by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills was 528,687 tonnes. The data for WEEE evidence published by compliance schemes originally suggested that 512,000 tonnes of WEEE had been collected in 2015.

BIS increase WEEE collection target for 2016

WEEE 2016 target increased

 

The Department for Business set the initial target based on the annual average growth of WEEE collection since 2011. However, the figures from the Environmental Agency for complete tonnage of WEEE collected in 2015 show that some WEEE collections had not been accounted for in the original figure.

The new data shows that more than 521,000 tonnes of WEEE was collected by compliance schemes last year. Large household appliances and cooling appliances made up the largest percentage of WEEE collected in England and Wales in 2015, at more than 290,000 tonnes.

As a consequence of this, the Department for Business has increased 2016’s target to 544,341 tonnes. Compared to the initial 2016 target, the new figure for this year has increased by 16,000 tonnes, however, it is a long way off meeting the EU’s target of 730,000 tonnes.

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